Tag Archives: Education

May 4, 2017. There are so many wonderful experiences from the USAID/Nepal Early Grade Reading Program that Another Option is working on.  Applying the behavior theories and strategies we use in our health and energy being utilized in education and early grade reading to encourage parents (…and grandparents and older siblings) to read with their children is one exciting experience.

Research shows that the most effective way to change behavior is through one-on-one experience or interpersonal communication. I saw it in action last week (April 24 ) when I attended a parent meeting in Bhaktapur, Nepal. The parents could not stop talking about their children….and especially their desire for them to learn how to read and to achieve beyond what they as parents have.

The meeting was a parent (peer) education training session conducted by the program’s social mobilizers.  Another Option developed the training guide the mobilizers are using to get parents to talk to other parents about the importance of Early Grade Reading and share tips on how they can go from desire for their children to read and excel to actually taking the necessary steps. The guide is posted on the web site (link).

It is powerful for parents to know that they are not doing this alone and that other parents are also trying to fit in time to read with their children with work outside of the home. Parents (peers) who have experience with reading at home share ideas and tips with parents such as relieving the child from some household chores to study and read each night and listening while the child reads for 10 minutes each day.

Parents and grandparents attended the training session, are a mix of residents and migrant families who live there for work. Parents learned the importance of early grade reading, talked about their ideas for

This is one of 250 trainings that will be held in this district in the next three months.

 

“My grandfather inspired me to read and always brought me books. Now when I travel, I always remember to bring back books for my children.”
Pushpa Basnet, CNN Hero 2016-17

“In the 2014 earthquake, houses with strong foundation withstood the damage. Early grade reading is the foundation to improve our children’s future.”
Mr. Baburam Poudel, Director General, Department of Education (DOE)

“Teaching is all encompassing – it is as cultural, social and familial process.”
Dhananjaya Sharma, Education Expert

The commitment and resolve of these statements reflect the focus of the media orientation workshop organized by the Department of Education (DOE) and the USAID-funded Early Grade Reading Program (EGRP).

Held on February 6 in Kathmandu, the workshop was the first opportunity for 28 Nepali print and broadcast media journalists to come together and understand the program and their role in strengthening the program. Using presentations and group discussions, Focal Person, Bishnu Adhikari, Deputy Director, DOE and EGRP Chief of Party, Edward Graybill along with other technical team leads, shared strategic ideas about the relationship between EGRP and the government’s National Early Grade Reading Program (NEGRP).

Further, participants received information packets with community mobilization and peer advocacy materials, developed and designed by the program, with the intention to facilitate better communication amongst beneficiary parents and between parents and teachers about children’s reading habit.

Mr. Baburam Poudel, Director General, Department of Education welcomed the participants and opened the workshop by reiterating the critical nature of quality early grade reading and stressed all involved stakeholders to work in tandem to improve access, quality and management of primary education.

Education expert, Mr. Dhananjaya Sharma called for teachers and other stakeholders in primary education to encourage two-way interactions with students and to change classroom settings to make it child-friendly among others.

Special guests at the orientation included comments by Ms. Basnet, named as a CNN Hero in 2016-2017. She stressed the importance of reading in her own personal development from a shy student to a confident woman.

Deputy Director Mr. Adhikari spoke at length about the National Early Grade Reading Program (NEGRP) and raised issues about program’s implementation including ownership of the program, lack of technical resources and lack of commitment of policy making and implementation.

A key message that came out of the interaction between the journalists and the EGRP and the government teams was that a strong sense of camaraderie and commitment to this important work was required from all stakeholders to implant the love for reading in Nepali children from the very early grades.

A similar workshop will be organized in Bhaktapur, Kaski, Banke, Saptari and Kanchanpur districts in February and March

This blog was prepared by Adheep Pokhrel, Communication Manager for USAID/Nepal’s Early Grade Reading Program managed by RTI International

parentpeeripc_engnep

Word of mouth or peer education is still the most reliable way to get information. Making sure that information is correct or accurate is another story.

One of Another Option’s role under USAID/Nepal’s Early Grade Reading Program managed by RTI International is to create awareness among parents of children in grades one through three about the benefits of reading, and for children to read outside of schools at home, reading corners, and libraries.

With the Ministry of Education, we developed a peer education guide to encourage parents to talk to other parents. Our research showed that parents talked to other parents about maneuvering their way through the school culture and to assure parents received good advice on what to do for their children to succeed.

Approved by the Ministry of Education and USAID/Nepal, the guide is in English and Nepali with plans to translate into three other languages. The training kit consists of three components: trainer guide, participant guide, and wall hanging with recommended behaviors and activities for parents.

An electronic version will be posted for any to use. Please give credit to USAID/Nepal. Drawings and illustrations by Keshar Joshi.

I came across this infographic the other day and found it tells a powerful story on the importance of girls education in its simple design and messaging. Education for women is the key to so many pressing development issues!

One of our partners, Girl Rising, a global action campaign for women’s education, are doing amazing work to advance the availability of education to women around the world. Check their website to see when the ground-breaking documentary, Girl Rising, will be shown near you.

USAID Women's Education Infographic

This infographic was produced by USAID as part of their 50th anniversary celebration. It represents USAID's commitment to education and provides some great statistics about the importance of educating women in developing nations.

SDI

The World Bank launched in Nairobi today its new Service Delivery Indicators Initiative – www.sdindicators.org and @WBAfrica – a rigorous evidence-based tool that provides a status report on health and education service delivery.

Working initially in six countries – Kenya, Tanzania, Nigeria, Uganda, Togo, and Senegal – with plans to expand to a total of  30 African countries….SDI makes available to policy leaders and decision makers as well as the general public information (data) so they can adequately assess the quality of health and education services and help in making informed decisions related to resource allocations.

Twenty indicators – 10 in health and 10 in education –

Visit the web site – www.sdindicators.org and congratulations to WB for this unique initiative